The News Site of Santa Monica College

Dances with boards: “Locals Only” tries to ride a great wave

Dances with boards: “Locals Only” tries to ride a great wave

Alci Rengifo, Editor-in-Chief
October 8, 2014
Filed under Culture, Reviews, Theater

After over a year in production, "Locals Only," the much heralded, first ever collaboration between multiple Santa Monica College departments, has finally premiered on the campus main stage. The expensive, ambitious project is a musical fairy tale full of adolescent views of love, life and the perils... Read more »

“Gone Girl”: A tale of love and darkness

“Gone Girl”: A tale of love and darkness

Rachel Gianuario
October 8, 2014
Filed under Culture, Reviews

David Fincher’s newest hit is another in the lineup up of Fincher-eqsue dark, bone-chilling mystery thrillers, with more twists and turns than “whitewater” river rapids. This weekend, “Gone Girl” led the box office with $38 million, with John R. Leonetti’s horror sequel about a demon possessed... Read more »

“Wetlands,” a film that bares all, but says nothing

“Wetlands,” a film that bares all, but says nothing

Alci Rengifo, Editor-in-Chief
September 17, 2014
Filed under Culture, Reviews, Reviews

We live in the age of sensationalism. In the landscape of current post-modernism, the limit is pushed in music, TV and film for the sake of being pushed, there does not even need to be the pretext of a coherent, focused idea(l). For a clear, in your face example, look no further than Germany's little... Read more »

“As Above, So Below”: “The Goonies” suddenly got really dark.

“As Above, So Below”: “The Goonies” suddenly got really dark.

Rachel Gianuario, News Editor
September 3, 2014
Filed under Culture, Reviews

“As Above, So Below”, from the director of “Quarantine” (2008) and “Devil” (2010), John Erick Dowdle, has become one of my new favorite horror flicks. This is not to say that the film isn’t wrought with irrationality and unintentional comedic moments, but what is important is its sheer... Read more »

The Kill Team is a foggy journey into the heart of darkness

The Kill Team is a foggy journey into the heart of darkness

Rachel Gianuario
August 14, 2014
Filed under Culture, Reviews, Reviews

“The Kill Team”, while gruesome and shocking in visuals, only explores a very narrow scope of the broader picture director Dan Krauss, previously nominated for “The Death of Kevin Carter” (2004), is aiming to clarify. The horrifying story of the U.S. Army platoon of infantry soldiers that... Read more »

Flashback Fridays: La Femme Nikita

Flashback Fridays: La Femme Nikita

Alci Rengifo, Editor In Chief
July 25, 2014
Filed under Culture, Reviews, Top Stories

With "Lucy" opening in theaters this week featuring Scarlett Johansson as the latest, hot blonde packing major heat, French director Luc Besson is returning to a specific kind of storytelling that has defined much of his pop action filmmaking career. In 1990 Besson made his breakthrough with the glossy,... Read more »

Flashback Friday: “Weird Al” Yankovic’s “Smells Like Nirvana”

Flashback Friday: “Weird Al” Yankovic’s “Smells Like Nirvana”

Juan Lopez, Digital Editor
July 18, 2014
Filed under Culture, Reviews, Top Stories

To start off with a cliche, it has often been said that imitation is the sincerest form of flattery. In 1992, Kurt Cobain said in an interview that he didn't realize Nirvana had "made it" until they had their own "Weird Al" Yankovic parody in the form of "Smells Like Nirvana." After trying to track down... Read more »

“Dawn of the Planet of the Apes” evolves past predecessor

“Dawn of the Planet of the Apes” evolves past predecessor

Juan Lopez, Digital Editor
July 14, 2014
Filed under Culture, Reviews, Top Stories

Dawn of the Planet of the Apes Grade: B After 45 years and seven movies of the "Planet of the Apes" franchise, you would think that they've run out of steam. With the one dimensional leading characters and wooden acting in the last film, "Dawn of the Planet of the Apes" is better than it has any r... Read more »

“Life Itself” is a moving chronicle of Roger Ebert’s life of letters and film

“Life Itself” is a moving chronicle of Roger Ebert’s life of letters and film

Alci Rengifo, Editor-in-Chief
July 8, 2014
Filed under Culture, Reviews, Top Stories

An unflinching view into the daily struggles of a man devoted to his passions, struck by illness and the harrowing, emotional toll.

Read more »

“Code Black”: A film as overcrowded as an emergency waiting room.

“Code Black”: A film as overcrowded as an emergency waiting room.

Rachel Gianuario, News Editor
July 8, 2014
Filed under Culture, Reviews

“Code Black” is a vivid medical documentary about way too many things. Within under an hour and a half, director Ryan McGarry halphazardly and deficiently burns through a handful of major topics dealing with the healthcare system. From the viewpoint of a surgeon cutting open a patient, to overflowing... Read more »

Film review: Third Person is a convoluted yet compelling collection of fragments

Film review: Third Person is a convoluted yet compelling collection of fragments

Rachel Gianuario, News Editor
July 1, 2014
Filed under Culture, Reviews

“Third Person”, Oscar-winner Paul Haggis’s latest offering, is an experiment of intricately woven together Aronofsky-like vignettes, perhaps too convoluted for his all-star cast to hold together. Despite the cast, ratings and box office earnings certainly fell far behind other art house flicks... Read more »

Flashback Fridays: “The Notebook” turns 10

Flashback Fridays: “The Notebook” turns 10

Alci Rengifo, Editor-in-Chief, Print
June 27, 2014
Filed under Culture, Reviews, Top Stories

"The Notebook" turns 10 this week, and its assault of cheese has not abated. For a decade now, this adaptation of a typical Nicholas Sparks fairy tale has become the standard by which all mush-ridden date flicks are judged. First released in 2004, Nick Cassavetes's attempt at a time-lapsing romance... Read more »

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