MeToo March Takes Over the Hollywood Walk of Fame

THE PROTEST

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Among the thick smoke from the Woolsey Fire and the tourist-packed Hollywood Walk of Fame, the second annual MeToo Survivors March took to the streets with drummers, Aztec dancers, and around 300 gathered women, men, and the non-binary genders on Saturday, November 10. 

Survivor and recording artist, Keyanna Celina, sings to the crowd as the second annual MeToo Survivors March begins on Hollywood Blvd in Los Angeles, California, on November 10, 2018. (Pyper Witt/ Corsair Staff)

Survivor and recording artist, Keyanna Celina, sings to the crowd as the second annual MeToo Survivors March begins on Hollywood Blvd in Los Angeles, California, on November 10, 2018. (Pyper Witt/ Corsair Staff)

This diverse group of protesters brought signs handmade and printed, and an array of different flags that they held overhead as the group made its way down the famous Hollywood boulevard and the surrounding streets. The march was not just for women's justice against sexual harassment and assault, as it also highlighted immigration issues, such as the notion to abolish ICE and protecting DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals) recipients, also called "Dreamers," safe in the US. Further, and very prominently, was the conviction that those who consider themselves Transgender have the right to do so, in response to President Trumps recent attacks on Transgender policy.

The Danza Mexica Cuauhtemoc Aztec dance group took the lead through the streets. They did not stop dancing until the protest returned to where it began in front of the TCL Chinese Theatre. The group danced as part of the protest due to the recent sexual allegations of their recent leader, Arturo “Pastel” Mireles.

The MeToo Survivors march was put on by MeToo International with supporters from SheDoes, Humanity First Coalition and AIMSoCal among others. On their Facebook page for the event it states that it was a “survivor focused event,” and thus had many speakers who were survivors of sexual abuse themselves. Those include the Times pick of the year in 2017, Sandra Pezqueda; recording artist Keyanna Celina; male MeToo survivor Jerome Kitchen; and organizer, long-term women activist Ivy Quicho. All of which received time to share their piece with the group in song, story, or speech. 

The tourists and bystanders of Hollywood boulevard could hear the echoes of the march from inside establishments, as many congregated outside their doors and on sidewalks to watch the procession pass by. They chanted, “What streets? Our streets,” “What do we want? Justice! When do we want it? Now!” and “Hear us! Believe us!” as the march moved forward through the layer of smoke and heat from the mid-day sun.



THE DANZA MEXICA CHUAUHTEMOC AZTEC DANCERS

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